Mrs Pritchard's A Level Language Blog

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Entries Tagged as 'Verbs'

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

February 18, 2012 by angelsue34 · No Comments · Language and gender, Revision, Verbs

Verbs - they do

Who knew that there were so many different types of verb!

What can you remember about verbs in general from Unit 1?

Hopefully that they are an action, they can be part of a verb phrase and that they are needed in sentences. You might also remember that we get auxiliary and modal auxiliary verbs (they ‘help out’).

For more verb goodness, and to revise your verbs and verb phrases, have a look here and have a go at the quiz when you are done:

Verbs and quiz on verbs – British Council site

Now, on to the ‘new’ verbs…

We looked at transitive and intransitive verbs and how they linked to processes and therefore gender.

  • Transitive – always answer the question ‘what’
  • Intransitive – always answer the questions ‘how’ ‘where’ ‘when’ and ‘why’

This lovely lady will explain more about transitive verbs:

We then explored the type of verb that was used and linked to gender, we found that:

Intransitive: Katie sighed – there is no object in the sentence and it appears that Katie is passive to whoever is making her sigh!

Transitive: Paul grabbed her hand – there is a direct object – her hand, Paul appears more dominant in his physical process

You can review the lesson slides here:

Verb Processes and gender

Things to remember:
Click to view clearly (site here)
  • Transitive – always answer the question ‘what’
  • Intransitive – always answer the questions ‘how’ ‘where’ ‘when’ and ‘why’
  • Male characters in fiction will often be associated with the transitive verb as they are ‘doing’ the action and are dominent
  • Female characters will often be involved in mental processes or intransitive physical processes – there will be no direct object (but there might be an adverb – don’t mix them up!)
Mrs P
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Fiction and stereotypes

February 18, 2012 by angelsue34 · No Comments · Language and gender, Verbs

A classic Mills and Boon cover

Here are the slides from our lesson on gender. We looked at actor and affected and how women are often portrayed as different in heavily gendered texts like this. We then looked at writing our own gendered text! Remember, Mills and Boons is an extreme example of gender stereotyping and not all fictional texts will be like this – some might even flout the patterns we picked up on.

Click on the link below to review the lesson slides:

Key things to remember:
  • What we mean by actor/ affected
  • What the choice of verbs tells you about the male or female role
  • Who is presented as having power and how this power is presented
  • What type of gendered situations romance literature is likely to put characters into
  • How typical this presentation of gender is in literature and what happens when it is flouted
Mrs P
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